Nordic Mussel And Cod Stew

Nordic Mussel And Cod Stew

With a nod to my Nordic roots and thanks to Trina Hahnemann’s wonderful book, The Nordic Diet, I have found a fast healthy way to enjoy the over- abundance of leeks from our garden. Who put steroids in their spot? They are hugely magnificent!
Leeks have an elegant subtle flavor which provides a perfect background for an adaptation of Trina’s recipe for mussel and cod stew with vegetables and white wine. I stock frozen mussels, cod and haddock so we enjoy this year round. Additionally, I freeze leeks so that I usually have them on hand.
With a hearty bread, this meal is ready in under thirty minutes.

Nordic Cod
Nordic Mussel And Cod Stew
1 lb mussels
1.5 lb. cod or haddock
2 leeks, crosswise sliced
3 celery stalks, cut into chunks. The leaves are great for color and flavor!
3 carrots, cut into chunks
4 quartered small new potatoes
Sea salt and ( optional Knorr Swiss Aromat Seasoning) * see footnote
Freshly ground pepper
12 oz dry white wine
2 sprigs of thyme
Optional:
Pinch of red pepper flakes
Lemon zest
Chopped dill for garnish
In a large saute pan, place the celery, carrots, leeks and potatoes and sprinkle with salt OR Aromat seasoning and pepper. Cover with wine and bring to a boil; turn down the heat and simmer for 5-8 minutes.
Remove the lid and arrange the cod and mussels between the vegetables. Sprinkle with a little more salt and add lemon zest and red pepper flakes if desired. Simmer additionally for 5 more minutes or until vegetables are fork tender. Remove thyme sprigs.
Serve in the saute pan with wedges of lemon and sprinkled with finely chopped dill.
*About Knorr Swiss Aromat
I have used this seasoning forever. It enhances flavor without overpowering the intent of the dish. One has to taste and taste again to learn how much salt to use in conjunction with the seasoning as it does contain some salt.
I would use the seasoning as salt until the final tasting to see if additional salt is needed. The container is a shaker so season as you would with a regular salt shaker.
I am never ever ever ever without it or heads roll somewhere.
Little kids in Switzerland and South Africa won’t eat their eggs without it.
Seriously.